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Monday - March 10, 2003

From: Houston, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Problem Plants, Wildflowers
Title: More on bluebonnets
Answered by: Stephen Brueggerhoff

QUESTION:

Clover has taken over and just about covered the Bluebonnets. Is there any way of removing the clover such as with fertilizer or something else?

ANSWER:

There is not a more effective method of depleting the population of the clover other than by hand removal. This clover, depending on the species, might be an annual, and with diligence, can be eliminated or reduced over a period of years by making sure it does not go to seed and by hand removal as it emerges. Bluebonnets are annuals as well, and letting these plants go to seed will enhance the chances for a future robust population. There might be specific herbicides that you can utilize to reduce these populations more immediately, but you will affect other plants than the target population you are trying to control. Consider long-term when utilizing any herbicide in your landscape.

 

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