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Tuesday - June 12, 2007

From: Mineral wells, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Variety of native tall plants for a screen in shady area near Ft. Worth
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, we live west of Ft Worth. We are looking for tall plants to form a visual screen along a chain link fence we share with a neighbor. We have post oaks there and it is very shady and the ground is sandy and sloping. Our neighbor has planted eleagnus along her side but it is only a few feet tall. The fence line is about 100 feet long and we would like a variety of native plants 6 to 10 foot tall. Can you suggest anything?

ANSWER:

Here are a variety of native shrubs or small trees from your area that fit your criteria:

Evergreens

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)

Rhus virens (evergreen sumac)

Deciduous

Amorpha fruticosa (desert false indigo)

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Rhus aromatica (fragrant sumac)

Rhus glabra (smooth sumac)

Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood)

Ilex decidua (possumhaw)

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum)

Ptelea trifoliata (common hoptree)

Frangula caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn)

Ungnadia speciosa (Mexican buckeye)

Viburnum rufidulum (rusty blackhaw)


Ilex vomitoria

Rhus virens

Amorpha fruticosa

Callicarpa americana

Rhus aromatica

Rhus glabra

Cornus drummondii

Ilex decidua

Prunus mexicana

Ptelea trifoliata

Frangula caroliniana

Ungnadia speciosa

 


Viburnum rufidulum
 

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