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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - March 10, 2016

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflower Center, Shrubs
Title: Location of Elbow Bush and Gregg's Saddlebush at the Wildflower Center
Answered by: Mike Tomme

QUESTION:

I have twice looked for Forestiera pubescens (Elbow Plant) and Mortonia greggi (Gregg's Saddlebush) in your gardens and have been unable to find. I have looked on the trails as well. Would you be able to direct me to a specific area to look for and photograph these two plants? Thanks for any help you can provide.

ANSWER:

There are a number of Forestiera pubescens (Elbow bush) (you can see this plant has a bunch of common names) located in the butterfly garden near the insectory, next to the short grass meadow. They are also fairly common out on the Restoration Research Trail and are most readily identified by the right angle at which twigs branch from the main stem.

There is a Mortonia greggii (Gregg's saddlebush) located next to the seating area across from the formal homeowner's inspiration garden. It is identified as Afinador. Again, several common names.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Elbow bush
Forestiera pubescens

Gregg's saddlebush
Mortonia greggii

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