Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - March 10, 2016

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflower Center, Shrubs
Title: Location of Elbow Bush and Gregg's Saddlebush at the Wildflower Center
Answered by: Mike Tomme

QUESTION:

I have twice looked for Forestiera pubescens (Elbow Plant) and Mortonia greggi (Gregg's Saddlebush) in your gardens and have been unable to find. I have looked on the trails as well. Would you be able to direct me to a specific area to look for and photograph these two plants? Thanks for any help you can provide.

ANSWER:

There are a number of Forestiera pubescens (Elbow bush) (you can see this plant has a bunch of common names) located in the butterfly garden near the insectory, next to the short grass meadow. They are also fairly common out on the Restoration Research Trail and are most readily identified by the right angle at which twigs branch from the main stem.

There is a Mortonia greggii (Gregg's saddlebush) located next to the seating area across from the formal homeowner's inspiration garden. It is identified as Afinador. Again, several common names.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Elbow bush
Forestiera pubescens

Gregg's saddlebush
Mortonia greggii

More Shrubs Questions

Survival of native yaupon in The Woodlands, TX after hurricane
September 25, 2008 - One of my large native yaupons trees (8ft) fell away from a group during the hurricane. I have uprighted and tied it off for stability. Now the leaves are all brown and falling. Is the tree dead or...
view the full question and answer

Is Texas Mountain Laurel Honey Toxic in Fulshear, TX?
March 11, 2012 - Toxicity of Texas Mountain Laurel HONEY I know the seeds and leaves of the Tx Mountain Laurel are toxic. But, is honey that comes from the Mountain Laurel toxic too? I heard that it is, but can'...
view the full question and answer

Availability of Michigan Holly berries in Northern Michigan
November 17, 2012 - I live in Northern Michigan, and am new in the wreath making business. Last year I found Michigan Holly berries and used them for my wreaths. They have the most beautiful berries I have ever seen, a...
view the full question and answer

Shrub with red two-globed berries
June 15, 2012 - I am looking for the name of a red berry with 2 globes attached to each other on a plant with small soft oval shaped leaves.I live in Maryland and they are maturing now. These bushes are in the park ...
view the full question and answer

Roses or other flowering plants for Coleman, Texas
March 10, 2009 - I want to plant native roses at a country home in Coleman Co., southern exposure, with well water, drip system,but ,hot, dry & windy! I know the Mutabilis does well in Austin, but, is it suitable for...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.