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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - March 07, 2016

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Butterfly Gardens, Planting, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Where to find milkweeds and other butterfly favorites
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

Our neighborhood in San Antonio is planning a big Arbor Day celebration. One of the events will focus on Monarch Butterflies. We will be releasing some live ones in our park and will have a booth that will give away Milkweed seeds and kids will be able to plant them in small containers at the booth. We want to sell or give away small plants that attract butterflies, but don't know where to find milkweed growing in small pots or what other kind of plants would be good to feature. The event will be in late April. Can you help us identify some plants that would be good for this event? Any other helpful hints?

ANSWER:

You are in luck!  The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Native Plant Sale will be held on April 9 and 10 (members' sale Apr. 8).  I am told that there will be several milkweed species available for sale.  The plant list is not yet available, but you can soon access it at this web site.  

Here is an answer to a previously asked question that lists many milkweed and similar species native to counties near San Antonio.  They should also grow near you.  Another answer shows a variety of nectar plants attractive to butterflies.  And I must not forget to add Conoclinium coelestinum (Blue mistflower), a big favorite not on the above lists.

Thank you for helping to preserve our butterflies.

 

From the Image Gallery


Blue mistflower
Conoclinium coelestinum

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