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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - January 26, 2016

From: Stuart, OK
Region: Southwest
Topic: Erosion Control, Wildflowers
Title: Low growing annuals for OK shaded slope.
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

I have a heavily shaded slope on the north, west, and south side of my home. Can you suggest some low growing annuals (flowering, or not) that would allow me to beautify my property.

ANSWER:

Let's start with a list of native annual plants for your area. Take a look at the Native Plant Database on the www.wildflower.org website and put in the following search criteria: State: OK, habit = herb (for herbaceous), Duration = annual, light requirement = shade, and size = 0-3 feet.

This will give you a couple plants to consider. They are:

Rudbeckia hirta (Black-eyed Susan), a cheerful wildflower considered an annual (or short-lived perennial). Bright yellow 2-3 inch wide daisy-like flowers with dark centers sit atop 1-2 foot stems. Forms a low rosette of leaves the first year and flowers the second year. This plant will have more blooms in sunnier sites.

Tridanis perfoliata (clasping Venus's looking glass), a distinctive annual with wheel-shaped, blue-violet flowers.  

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Black-eyed susan
Rudbeckia hirta

Black-eyed susan
Rudbeckia hirta

Black-eyed susan
Rudbeckia hirta

Black-eyed susan
Rudbeckia hirta

Clasping venus's looking-glass
Triodanis perfoliata

Clasping venus's looking-glass
Triodanis perfoliata

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