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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

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Sunday - April 22, 2007

From: schenectady, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Recovery of non-native star jasmine from freezing in New York
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, I have a star jasmine plant that was left outside over the winter. Will it come back to life? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Our focus and expertise at the Wildflower Center is with plants native to North America and, unfortunately, star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) is a native of China, not North America. However, we can tell you that the USDA hardiness zone rating for the star jasmine is 8-10 (annual minimum temperature of 10 to 40 degrees F); whereas, except for Long Island which is in zone 7, New York's hardiness zones range from 3 to 6 (-40 to 0 degrees F). So, unhappily, I'm afraid your star jasmine probably is done for. However, you could try cutting it back and hope for the best.

 

 

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