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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

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Wednesday - November 25, 2015

From: Wichita Falls, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Privacy Screening, Trees
Title: Evergreen screening tree for Wichita Falls TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Recommendations for a screen plant. Dry. full sun. 20 to 30 ft.high. evergreen. Wichita Falls, TX location.

ANSWER:

Your best choice for a tall evergreen screening plant is Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar).  It is indigenous to the Wichita Falls area, occurring in adjacent Cotton County, Oklahoma (according to the USDA Plants Database distribution map) and is thus well-adapted to the climate and the soils.  There are several cultivars to choose from and it can be pruned to maintain a hedge.

The following three suggestions are not native to the Wichita Falls area but are native to other nearby areas of Texas.

Juniperus ashei (Ashe juniper) occurs in Central and West Texas. Here is the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon) is indigenous to East and Central Texas.  It has many cultivars and can form a dense hedge with red berries in the winter that attract birds.  Here is the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

Hesperocyparis arizonica [syn. = Cupressus arizonica] (Arizona cypress) is native to West Texas and other southwestern states.  Here is the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

All of the above are listed as being available at Wichita Valley Landscaping in Wichita Falls.

 

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Ashe juniper
Juniperus ashei

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

Arizona cypress
Hesperocyparis arizonica

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