Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - September 14, 2015

From: Fort Worth, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Transplants, Shrubs, Trees
Title: Will a Texas Mountain Laurel thrive in a 4'x4'x4' brick planter. pl
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Would a Texas Mountain Laurel thrive in a 4'x4'x4'x4' brick planter with a drain at the bottom? It will get full sun all day. If not, would a Green Cloud Sage or a Waxleaf Myrtle work? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Lets start by looking at these plants in our Native Plant Database

Mountain Laurel Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel)

Green Cloud Sage Leucophyllum frutescens (Cenizo)

Waxleaf myrtle Morella cerifera (Wax myrtle)

To summarize: all three require full sun, and well drained soil. Mountain Laurel  and Green Cloud Sage prefer alkaline soil where as Wax Myrtle prefers slightly acidic soil. Since you are planting them in a planter, you can control this. The planter that you describe sounds fairly large, so I’m assuming you are purchasing a fairly large plant to put in it. Consulting our suppliers directory can get you in touch with suppliers of native plants in your area. Of the three plants, only theTexas Mountain laurel is native in Tarrant County, but since you are planning to grow them in a planter, you can probably make it work.

The Mountain Laurel has a reputation for being hard to transplant, but there seems to be little problem with the other two. I’m providing you with some links that will help you through the process.

Texas Mountain Laurel
    aggiehorticulture

    wintergardenursery

    home guides 

Green Cloud Sage

Wax myrtle 

Just a word about geometry; most geometric objects are described by three dimensions, ie length, height, and width . In the case of your planter, that would be 4’x4’x4’.


 

From the Image Gallery


Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Cenizo
Leucophyllum frutescens

Wax myrtle
Morella cerifera

More Transplants Questions

Native wildflower garden for Pennsylvania
May 21, 2008 - Hello, I am interested in making a garden, and I would like to use only or mostly native wildflowers in it. Do you have any good suggestions for wildflowers that I can transplant from places where the...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting bamboo
July 29, 2008 - To transplant bamboo from one place to another, do you dig the plant up or do you get a cutting, put it in water and then root the plant?
view the full question and answer

Division of impatiens grown in a pot
December 08, 2007 - I have an impatient and it is growing out of the pot. I was wondering if it were possible to divide it somehow and have two medium size plants.
view the full question and answer

Garden problems from Centreville VA
July 23, 2011 - Plants die, trees won't grow. I've replaced the soil (6") twice. Replaced grass twice and planted new plants and tree. After two yrs, the tree is still the same size and the flowering bushes nea...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting Mustang Grapes
June 15, 2006 - What is the best way to grow mustang grapes? We have vines established over the property but up too high to continue to harvest and a couple of young vines on the ground that haven't reached the clo...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.