Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Wednesday - June 17, 2015

From: St. Louis, MO
Region: Midwest
Topic: Soils
Title: Native Plants by Soil Type
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

Can't find an appropriate place to ask this - would love to be able to search for plants that do best in acidic soil (soil pH) another filter on the search screen. May not be there because the data doesn't exist for all of the plants in terms of the specific pH but acid/acidic does also appear sometimes in the soil description.

ANSWER:

Good question! It is a bit challenging to find native plants listed by their soil pH levels. So to get this information another way, take a look at the soil acidity maps for the U.S. at the Biota of North America website and you will get a good overview of where the acidic and alkaline soils are across the country. You can click on your state and get more specific information about the soil pH for your county. With this information you can look for the native plants in acidic or alkaline soil regions and start to make your lists. This webpage also has some other interesting soil maps too if you are interested - moisture, soil depth, volcanic soils and more. The Missouri Botanical Garden has a good landscaping with native plants information sheet online that might be of interest to you as well.

 

More Soils Questions

Stress in potted Tif blueberry plants
August 15, 2008 - Recently purchased Tif Blue Blueberry plants (about 3 ft tall)are showing signs of stress. They are in 10 gallon pots. Should they be transplanted? Medium? Fertilizer? Location? Trimming?
view the full question and answer

Wildflower seeds that do well in black clay soil from Plano TX
November 21, 2013 - What native wildflower seeds do best in black clay soil? We live in Plano along creek w/ 8,000 sq. ft. in full sun. No manmade water source. Suggestions?
view the full question and answer

Non-blooming yuccas in Brooklyn CT
July 14, 2013 - I have outdoor yucca plants that don't flower - - in full sun. Why?
view the full question and answer

Seeding the banks of a large pond
October 18, 2011 - I have a 2 acre surface pond that is mostly a hard clay bank all around. The water level is way down and I will begin filling it very soon. I need to somehow being affordable, plant something or thing...
view the full question and answer

Habiturf installation after Take-All fungus
January 24, 2012 - Are other soil remedies needed (besides those listed in your Habiturf brochure) to install Habiturf on land which had a St. Augustine lawn which was decimated by take all patch.
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.