Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - June 16, 2015

From: Burnet, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Cacti and Succulents, Wildflowers
Title: Twist-leaf Yucca flowering in Burnet County, TX.
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I recently moved to Burnet County and our property is full of twist leaf yuccas which are now blooming, but not all are blooming. Why do some twist leaf yuccas bloom and others don't? Are they male female? I have a group of twist leaf yuccas growing in a cluster, do they propagate through the roots? No yucca in this group is blooming, does that have anything do do with how they are propagated? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Once mature, a Yucca sp. plant will flower repeatedly, but not necessarily every year.  Yuccas produce their large flower-bearing inflorescences using energy stored in their roots in the form of carbohydrates.  The energy requirements necessary for flowering are substantial and it often takes a plant more than one year after flowering to recover sufficiently to flower again.

Yuccas increase by both offsets and by seeds.  Young plants will not begin flowering until they reach a sufficient stage of maturity and food storage to produce flowers.  Yucca flowers are hermaphroditic, having both male and female parts.  They are dependent on a single species of moth for pollination and in areas where the moth is rare or absent (such as Austin, TX) yuccas produce flower, but rarely produce fruit.

 

More Propagation Questions

Failure of hybridized red hollies to grow
April 17, 2008 - I have 2 red hollies planted in my yard about 20' apart, 3 years now. They won't grow. Do I need to have a male with them?
view the full question and answer

Allelopathc qualities in sunflowers
June 19, 2007 - I have a sunflower patch in the corner of my backyard (Maximilians, common sunflower, and silverleaf sunflower)and would like to use the spent stalks (sans the seedheads) as mulch in the fall. Howeve...
view the full question and answer

Problems with Eves necklacepods (Styphnolobium affine)
March 25, 2008 - Mr. S-P, I urgently need your advice regarding two Eve's necklacepods that appear to be dying. They are in two completely different areas of my yard. One began leafing out and then the leaves sh...
view the full question and answer

Planting begonias in the Dallas area
March 25, 2009 - What month is it time to plant begonias in the Dallas, Texas area?
view the full question and answer

Plant cloning or genetic engineering
February 23, 2012 - Can you take one genome (strain) and take a clean cut and put onto another plant another strain?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.