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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - June 21, 2015

From: Frisco, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Native flowering aromatic trees for Frisco, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Dear Smartplants, I live in Frisco, Texas. Could you please suggest me good native flowering aromatic trees from 12 to 50 feet. Thank you so much

ANSWER:

Here are some native flowering trees that occur in Collin County, Texas.  Some of them are aromatic as well.

Ungnadia speciosa (Mexican buckeye) has beautiful pink flowers that are aromatic.

Viburnum rufidulum (Rusty blackhaw viburnum) has clusters of white flowers in the spring but are not particularly aromatic.

Styphnolobium affine (Eve's necklace) has pinkish aromatic flowers.

Rhus lanceolata (Prairie flameleaf sumac) has clusters of not notably aromatic flowers that produce clusters of red berries.  The leaves of the tree turn brilliant red in the fall.

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum) has showy white aromatic flowers and produces edible plums.

Prosopis glandulosa (Honey mesquite) has small greenish-white flowers that are aromatic.  The foliage is delicate and airy.

Cercis canadensis var. texensis (Texas redbud) produces very showy, but not aromatic, flowers in the spring.  The blossoms are edible and can be used in salads, etc.

You can see more choices in the Texas-North Central Recommended list.

 

From the Image Gallery


Mexican buckeye
Ungnadia speciosa

Rusty blackhaw viburnum
Viburnum rufidulum

Eve's necklace
Styphnolobium affine

Prairie flameleaf sumac
Rhus lanceolata

Prairie flameleaf sumac
Rhus lanceolata

Mexican plum
Prunus mexicana

Honey mesquite
Prosopis glandulosa

Eastern redbud
Cercis canadensis

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