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Wednesday - April 15, 2015

From: Hopatcong, NJ
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Plant Lists, Drought Tolerant, Herbs/Forbs, Wildflowers
Title: New Jersey Native Plants for a Raised Bed
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

I want to plant some native plants in a raised bed in New Jersey along side a stucco wall that gets direct sun and is very dry due to an overhang. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Let’s start with a list of native plants for your area. Take a look at the Native Plant Database on the www.wildflower.org website and put in the following search criteria: State = New Jersey, habit = herb (for herbaceous), duration = perennial, light requirement = full sun, soil moisture = dry, height = 1-3 feet. This search will reveal 46 native plants to consider.

Some tough possibilities include ...

Achillea millefolium (Common yarrow)

Anaphalis margaritacea (Western pearly everlasting)

Asclepias tuberosa (butterflyweed)

Campanula rotundifolia (Bluebell bellflower)

Coreopsis verticillata (Treadleaf coreopsis)

Echinacea purpurea (Eastern purple coneflower)

Monarda fistulosa (Wild bergamot)

Phlox pilosa (Downy phlox)

Ratibida columnifera (Mexican hat)

Scutellaria incana (Hoary skullcap)

Symphyotrichum laeve var. laeve (Smooth blue aster)

Tradescantia virginiana (Virginia spiderwort)

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Common yarrow
Achillea millefolium

Western pearly everlasting
Anaphalis margaritacea

Butterflyweed
Asclepias tuberosa

Bluebell bellflower
Campanula rotundifolia

Threadleaf coreopsis
Coreopsis verticillata

Eastern purple coneflower
Echinacea purpurea

Wild bergamot
Monarda fistulosa

Downy phlox
Phlox pilosa

Mexican hat
Ratibida columnifera

Hoary skullcap
Scutellaria incana

Smooth blue aster
Symphyotrichum laeve var. laeve

Virginia spiderwort
Tradescantia virginiana

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