Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - November 25, 2014

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders
Title: Migrating Turkey tail fungus in garden in Austin, TX
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I have turkey tail fungus that has migrated from a rotting elm tree stump to a part of my garden that has a healthy wax myrtle tree and other native shrubs, but no rotting tree stumps. Its presence has turned the leaves of some of the plants rust-colored. How do I get rid of these unwelcome mushrooms? Thanks,

ANSWER:

The turkey tail fungus, Trametes versicolor, is a polypore mushroom that lives on dead and decaying trees. In your case it is a an elm stump. Here is another link that describes this common mushroom. click here .
 You didn’t mention how far it has migrated, but one possibility is that it is following a rotting root of the elm stump.

The rust-colored leaves may well be caused by a fungus, but I don’t think that Trametes versicolor is the culprit because it grows on rotting wood. It is hard to diagnose a plant disease from a written description, so I recommend that you have a knowledgeable person take a look at your plants. You can find such a person by contacting the Travis County Office of Texas AgriLife Extension.

I’ve included a link about controlling tree fungus , and one about fungicides.

 

 

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Changing bloom color from Tulsa OK
June 27, 2011 - How do you change the bloom color?
view the full question and answer

Green cyst-like growths on Texas persimmon leaves
September 20, 2013 - We have a mature Texas persimmon. We just noticed some green cyst-like growths on the tops of some of the leaves. The undersides of those leaves have black spots where the growths are. They looks like...
view the full question and answer

Problems with red tip photinia in San Antonio
March 29, 2009 - I have a red tip photinia that's about 20 years old and about 20 feet high--it is big! I noticed last summer the highest leaves looked droopy all the time even with deep watering and now that portion...
view the full question and answer

Stress on Goldenball leadtrees from Austin
June 07, 2014 - I know of two separate instances where young Goldenball Lead Trees (leucena retusa) have shown symptoms of defoliation and a bleeding of white sap from sores that have developed on the bark. The first...
view the full question and answer

Yellowing leaves of Texas Sage (Cenizo) from Las Vegas NV
November 21, 2013 - Leaves of Texas Sage are turning yellow. Can you tell me why?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.