Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Monday - October 06, 2014

From: Allen, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Butterfly Gardens
Title: Plant that attracts butterflies, perhaps?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is that one plant/flower in your Center that attracts wildflowers like crazy? It's got a cute name, not a Latin or Scientific name. I have the plant, but don't know how to make it spread.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is confused!   Do you, perhaps, mean a plant that attracts butterflies?  That could be Conoclinium coelestinum (Blue mistflower)Conoclinium greggii (Gregg's mistflower) or maybe some other plant like Asclepias tuberosa (Butterflyweed).  It would help us to have a description of the plant—size, flower color, bloom time, what type of leaves, etc.  We might be able to identify it with more information.

By the way, all plants have a Latin or scientific name—the common name or names, however, are usually a lot easier to remember.  Plants have only one "accepted" Latin or scientific name, but can have one to many common names.

 

From the Image Gallery


Blue mistflower
Conoclinium coelestinum

Blue mistflower
Conoclinium coelestinum

Gregg's mistflower
Conoclinium greggii

Gregg's mistflower
Conoclinium greggii

Butterflyweed
Asclepias tuberosa

Butterflyweed
Asclepias tuberosa

More Butterfly Gardens Questions

More questions about Asclepias spp.
December 24, 2008 - Hi. Thank-you for replying to my message. What does Emory's Milkweed look like? I have been trying to find out, but no luck. Also What Milkweeds did you find for sale as seeds and plants? Does Texas ...
view the full question and answer

Butterfly plants for Austin
May 21, 2008 - Hummingbirds come to our Mexican honeysuckle early in the spring, and then come late in the summer when the Turk's caps bloom. We have rocky soil, and a fairly shady garden. What could we plant that ...
view the full question and answer

Native annuals for pollinators in King County, Washington
February 06, 2014 - I live in King County, Washington State, and I have a plot in a community garden. Rather than plant food, I'd like to attract pollinators. I need to use native annuals rather than perennials as the c...
view the full question and answer

Sun loving plants for flower bed by the pool in Weatherford Texas
October 03, 2011 - We have a 40' long x 2 1/2' wide flowerbed along our pool. It is in full sun with the pool deck across the front and a 6' privacy fence across back. Also, the level of the bed is 18" below the l...
view the full question and answer

How toxic are milkweed (Asclepias spp.)?
November 01, 2011 - We are considering a monarch waystation for our local elementary and are concerned about milkweed toxicity. Would it be safe to plant it in reach of children?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.