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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Wednesday - October 15, 2014

From: Severna Park, MD
Region: Select Region
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives
Title: Nativity of various bulbs
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Are the following bulbs native? Chionodoxa forbesii Camassia leichflinii Crocus Sprint tommasinianus Barr's Purple Hyacinthoides hispanica Narcissus 'Actea' Scilla siberica 'Spring Beauty' Tulipa Madame Lefeber Red Emperor

ANSWER:

The only bulb on the list that is native to North America is Camassia leichtlinii (Large camas).  You can see more information and a photo from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Chionodoxa forbesii (Glory of the Snow) is not native to North America, but native to Turkey.

Crocus tommasinianus (woodland crocus) is not native to North America, but to Hungary and the northern Balkans.

Hyacinthoides hispanic (Hispanic hyacinthoides) is not native to North America.  It is native to Spain, Portugal and northwest Africa.

None of the species in the Genus Narcissus are native to North America, but are native to Europe, North Africa and West Asia.

Scilla siberica (Siberian squill) is not native to North America.  It is native to southwestern Russia, the Caucasus and Turkey.  It is considered invasive in Minnesota.

None of the species in the Genus Tulipa is native to North America.  Tulipa species are native to Europe, western and central Asia and North Africa.

You can find more information about most of these species on the Pacific Bulb Society site.

 

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