Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Wednesday - October 15, 2014

From: Severna Park, MD
Region: Select Region
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives
Title: Nativity of various bulbs
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Are the following bulbs native? Chionodoxa forbesii Camassia leichflinii Crocus Sprint tommasinianus Barr's Purple Hyacinthoides hispanica Narcissus 'Actea' Scilla siberica 'Spring Beauty' Tulipa Madame Lefeber Red Emperor

ANSWER:

The only bulb on the list that is native to North America is Camassia leichtlinii (Large camas).  You can see more information and a photo from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Chionodoxa forbesii (Glory of the Snow) is not native to North America, but native to Turkey.

Crocus tommasinianus (woodland crocus) is not native to North America, but to Hungary and the northern Balkans.

Hyacinthoides hispanic (Hispanic hyacinthoides) is not native to North America.  It is native to Spain, Portugal and northwest Africa.

None of the species in the Genus Narcissus are native to North America, but are native to Europe, North Africa and West Asia.

Scilla siberica (Siberian squill) is not native to North America.  It is native to southwestern Russia, the Caucasus and Turkey.  It is considered invasive in Minnesota.

None of the species in the Genus Tulipa is native to North America.  Tulipa species are native to Europe, western and central Asia and North Africa.

You can find more information about most of these species on the Pacific Bulb Society site.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

How to care for non-native gardenia
May 10, 2010 - My gardenia is about 20 years old about 5 feet tall and for the first time is leggy looking this year, not too many leaves and they don't look real healthy. Do I need to cut it back some. Last year...
view the full question and answer

Failure to thrive of non-native Buddleja davidii
June 30, 2008 - I love butterfly bushes - but have bad luck growing them. I now have several, including Butterfly Nanho Purple; and they constantly wilt. It has been a dry hot Austin summer, but should I water when...
view the full question and answer

Propagation of non-native Selenicereus Antonyanus from Warwick RI
March 24, 2012 - I just purchased a Selenicereus Anthonyanus, Rick Rack Cactus unrooted. I have searched on the web of the proper way to root the plant and have had no luck except it says easy rooting but not how to r...
view the full question and answer

Non-native invasive Chocolate Mimosa in Gulfport MS
May 18, 2011 - Another Mimosa Question: I have a newly planted chocolate mimosa; it has a single, 7 ft spindly trunk with approximately a 3 ft canopy. I'm afraid that its girth will not withstand much in terms of...
view the full question and answer

Deer resistant plants for Trinity, TX
March 23, 2013 - I need a list of deer resistant flowers, herbs and plants that would could be planted in Trinity, Texas.
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.