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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - May 20, 2014

From: Houston, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Problem Plants, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Removal of thistles from Columbus TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am sorry if you have an answer in FAQs but I could not find it. We recently cleared property near Columbus Texas of many cedars (ash junipers). This spring we experienced a profusion of thistle - big and many. How do we remove them?

ANSWER:

It's okay, we can't remember where previous answers are ourselves, even though we answered them ourselves. Begin with this previous answer on thistles in Central Texas. In cases like this, we don't worry about native and non-native, if they are obnoxious, you want to get rid of them. When you get to that answer, you will find another, Native and Non-native Thistles, that we recommend you follow, also, along with any other links. Finally, for the nuts and bolts of thistle removal, Mr. Smarty Plants has addressed this exact question before and, even though this previous answer is from Ohio, it tells you exactly what we would say again, and we are getting lazy. Easier for the same answer to be read twice than for us to type the same answer twice. We do warn you, this is not going to be easy, native or not, these plants take care of themselves.

These solutions are not easy, a lot of hard work is involved but we never promised you a rose garden, did we?

 

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