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Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine) | NPIN
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Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine)
Chaney, Patsy

Pinus taeda

Pinus taeda L.

Loblolly pine, Old field pine, Bull pine, Rosemary pine

Pinaceae (Pine Family)

Synonym(s):

USDA Symbol: PITA

USDA Native Status: L48 (N)

The principal commercial southern pine, a large, resinous, and fragrant tree with rounded crown of spreading branches. Loblolly pine is a 60 ft. tree which can reach 110 ft. It loses its lower branches with age, leaving an open, rounded crown. Dark green needles are 6-10 in. long. Bark is gray and scaly.

Loblolly Pine is native in 15 southeastern states. Among the fastest-growing southern pines, it is extensively cultivated in forest plantations for pulpwood and lumber. One of the meanings of the word loblolly is mud puddle, where these pines often grow. It is also called Bull Pine, from the giant size, and Rosemary Pine, from the fragrant resinous foliage.

 

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Tree
Leaf Complexity: Simple
Leaf Shape: Linear
Leaf: Green
Fruit: Brown
Size Class: 72-100 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Time: Feb , Mar

Distribution

USA: AL , AR , DC , DE , FL , GA , IL , KY , LA , MD , MS , NC , NJ , OK , SC , TN , TX , VA
Native Distribution: Coastal Plain & Piedmont from s. NJ to c. FL, w. to e. TX & n. in Mississippi Valley to extreme s.e. OK, c. AR & s. TN
Native Habitat: Sandy or gravelly savannas & hilly woodlands

Growing Conditions

Water Use: High
Light Requirement: Part Shade
Soil Moisture: Dry
CaCO3 Tolerance: Medium
Cold Tolerant: yes
Soil Description: Adaptable, but prefers moist, sandy soils. Sandy, Sandy Loam Acid-based, Medium Loam
Conditions Comments: Loblolly will respond well to extra moisture and richer soils. One of the fastest-growing southern pines. A pioneer species along river bottoms. Often infected with a rust which produces prominent, enlarged areas on twigs, branches and trunks. Also suffers damage from pine beetles.

Benefit

Use Ornamental: Fast growing, Fire Resistant, Attractive
Use Wildlife: Nesting site, Cover, Seeds-Small mammals, Seeds-granivorous birds.
Attracts: Birds , Butterflies
Larval Host: Elfin butterfly.

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA)

Pinus taeda is a larval host and/or nectar source for:
Southern pine sphinx
(Lapara coniferarum)

Larval Host
Learn more at BAMONA
Elf
(Microtia elva)

Larval Host
Learn more at BAMONA

Propagation

Propagation Material: Seeds
Description: Sow fresh, untreated seed in late fall.
Seed Collection: Collect cones from vigorous trees in late summer and fall just before they completely open to drop seeds. Spread cones on racks to dry so they will release seeds. Cones may be shaken to release seeds. Store at a moisture content of 5-10% fresh weight.
Commercially Avail: yes
Maintenance: Prevent complete soil dryness, Prune to maintain shape, Remove dead growth, Fertilize 3 times a year with lawn fertilizer 3:1:2 ratio

Find Seed or Plants

View propagation protocol from Native Plants Network.

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National Wetland Indicator Status

Region:AGCPAKAWCBEMPGPHIMWNCNEWMVE
Status: FAC FAC FAC UPL UPL
This information is derived from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Wetland Plant List, Version 3.1 (Lichvar, R.W. 2013. The National Wetland Plant List: 2013 wetland ratings. Phytoneuron 2013-49: 1-241). Click here for map of regions.

From the National Organizations Directory

According to the species list provided by Affiliate Organizations, this plant is on display at the following locations:

Pineywoods Native Plant Center - Nacogdoches, TX
Delaware Nature Society - Hockessin, DE
Crosby Arboretum - Picayune, MS
Stengl Biological Research Station - Smithville, TX
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department - Austin, TX
Georgia Native Plant Society - Atlanta, GA

Bibliography

Bibref 766 - Dale Groom's Texas Gardening Guide (2002) Groom, D.
Bibref 1186 - Field Guide to Moths of Eastern North America (2005) Covell, C.V., Jr.
Bibref 1185 - Field Guide to Western Butterflies (Peterson Field Guides) (1999) Opler, P.A. and A.B. Wright
Bibref 1620 - Gardening with Native Plants of the South (Reprint Edition) (2009) Wasowski, S. with A. Wasowski
Bibref 355 - Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest (1991) Miller, G. O.
Bibref 318 - Native Texas Plants: Landscaping Region by Region (2002) Wasowski, S. & A. Wasowski
Bibref 291 - Texas Wildscapes: Gardening for Wildlife (1999) Damude, N. & K.C. Bender

Search More Titles in Bibliography

From the Archive

Wildflower Newsletter 1988 VOL. 5, NO.5 - Penny Campaign Grows Oklahoma Wildflowers, Wildflower Center Collects Honors, Di...

Additional resources

USDA: Find Pinus taeda in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Pinus taeda in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Pinus taeda

Metadata

Record Modified: 2013-09-05
Research By: TWC Staff

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