En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - March 20, 2013

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Laws, Trees
Title: Trees prohibited or regulated in Albuquerque
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Are there certain trees that not not allowed to be planted in Albuquerque, New Mexico because of city regulations?

ANSWER:

Yes, there are trees that are restricted in Albuquerque to control their allergenic pollen.  You can read the 1994 Albuquerque Pollen Control Ordinance and the Amendment to the Pollen Ordinance (2004).  The City of Albuquerque also has a webpage titled "Restricted Trees for Pollen Control."

Here are the restricted trees according to the 2004 amendment to the pollen ordinance.  If you click on the link you can see the North American native members of the genus in our Native Plant Database.  Non-native members of the genera are also prohibited:

  1. All trees in the Genus Cupressus (cypress trees)
  2. All male trees in the Genus Juniperus (juniper/cedar trees)
  3. All trees in the Genus Morus (mulberry trees)
  4. All trees in the Genus Populus (cottonwoods and poplars) with the exception of:  P. fremontii var. wizlizenii [syn=P. deltoides ssp. wislizeni] (Rio Grande cottonwood), P. tremuloides (quaking aspen) and P. acuminata (lanceleaf or mountain cottonwood)
  5. All trees in the Genus Ulmus with the exception of:  U. parvifolia (dioecious Chinese elm), U. americana 'Ascendens' (American elm), U. glabra 'Horizontalis' (Wych elm), U. minor 'Gracilus' (I could not find any information about this last one; but then neither could the City of Albuquerque, apparently).   All these elm exceptions are reportedly resistant to Dutch elm disease.

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Shade Trees for Bullhead City, AZ
August 12, 2014 - We have a patio with 2 old (unused) fire pit cut-outs; about 4 ft wide each. The cut out is not lined with concrete or brick: just rimmed with the concrete on all sides. The center of the cut-outs i...
view the full question and answer

Problems with live oak in Carrollton TX
April 03, 2011 - This past winter was very hard on all the trees in our area in Texas, but added to our stress was the loss of three large Bradford pears just prior to the winter (23yrs old and over 50ft spans of limb...
view the full question and answer

Small, slow-growing native tree for Houston
October 05, 2008 - Can you please recommend a pretty, small, slow growing tree for my bed centerpiece? It gets some sun/partial shade in front of my Houston area north facing home and must survive heat and some drought...
view the full question and answer

Trimming oak threatening fence in California
July 21, 2008 - I live in Diamond Springs,California,I have a large oak tree growing between my neighbors' house and mine. A large branch is cracked and in danger of falling on my fence,I would like to lighten it up...
view the full question and answer

Is a permit needed to plant liveoaks on property or on easement
May 25, 2007 - My house is located behind 1431 in Williamson county My backyard faces 1431 hwy and the noise and view aren't pleasant. I'm trying to plant some live oaks behind the wall and, of course, some in m...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center