En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - September 28, 2006

From: Austin , TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Excessive nitrogen inhibiting coreopsis blooms
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I planted coreopsis in the summer last year and they bloomed profusely nonstop from June 2005 to April 2006. However, this past summer, continuing to present time, my coreopsis have not bloomed at all nor do they show signs of incoming bloom. These coreopsis are in my Austin home. Please advise! I also planted the same coreopsis in my other house in Ponca City Oklahoma. They just started showing a few blooms. It seems like thay are more foliage than blooms. Please advise!

ANSWER:

The description you give for your coreopsis plants makes us think that they are getting too much nitrogen. High soil fertility will result in lots of plant and foliage growth, but suppress flowering. If you've been feeding your coreopsis it would be a good idea to stop, or at least decrease the amount of nitrogen in the fertilizer. Some natural fertilizers, especially manure-based ones are especially high in nitrogen. Plants receiving too much nitrogen will typically have very dark green, leathery foliage.
 

More Wildflowers Questions

What insect eats Alamo Fire blue bonnets from League City TX
June 10, 2013 - What insect eats Alamo Fire blue bonnets? Something seems to be eating new seedpods.
view the full question and answer

Need Advice on Rescuing Winecups in Hurst, Texas
February 03, 2011 - My grandmother's back yard used to be filled with the wild wine cup flowers, but they disappeared for years, due to (I think) flooding caused by runoff from housing development. Last spring I noticed...
view the full question and answer

Plants for steep clay bank in Summerfield OH
April 07, 2012 - Hello, We have a steep 15-20 foot high bank behind our house here in southern Ohio. Probably 50 ft.long. What could we plant for beauty and erosion control. It is nasty clay soil with lots of shale an...
view the full question and answer

Does the Dyschoriste oblongifolia attract snakes ?
May 19, 2010 - Does the Dyschoriste oblongifolia (oblongleaf snakeherb)attract snakes?
view the full question and answer

Germination of Texas wildflowers in jiffy pots
April 26, 2007 - My daughter is planning to grow a Texas Wildflower (indoor for starters) garden for a project. We recently purchased seeds from your store. Will planting them in jiffy pots be sufficient to sprout t...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center