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Friday - November 02, 2012

From: Canyon Lake, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Fast growing shade tree for Canyon Lake, TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the best, fastest growing shade tree to plant in a residential yard about 1/2 block from the Guadelupe River in Sattler, Texas?

ANSWER:

Here are five native possibilities that grow relatively fast and should do well in Canyon Lake, TX:

Ulmus americana (American elm) and here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Quercus polymorpha (Mexican white oak) and here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash) and here is more information from Texas Tree Selector.

Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinkapin oak) and here is more information from Texas A&M's Aggie Horticulture.

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) and here is more information from East Tennessee State University.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


American elm
Ulmus americana

American elm
Ulmus americana

Mexican white oak
Quercus polymorpha

Mexican white oak
Quercus polymorpha

Texas ash
Fraxinus albicans

Texas ash
Fraxinus albicans

Chinkapin oak
Quercus muehlenbergii

Chinkapin oak
Quercus muehlenbergii

American sycamore
Platanus occidentalis

American sycamore
Platanus occidentalis

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