En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - August 16, 2012

From: Brownsville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Problem Plants, Shrubs
Title: Male or female Jatropha curcas from Brownsville TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How do know the sex of a young Jatropha C. plant? how many weeks before you can tell a boy/girl plant ?

ANSWER:

Somewhat to our surprise there were several species of the genus Jatropha, a member of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge) family, native to North America. One that comes closest to your identification of Jatropha C. is Jatropha cathartica (Berlandier's nettlespurge). According to our Native Plant Database, it is endemic to Texas in North America, but also grows in Mexico. This USDA Plant Profile Map shows that it does grow in several counties in South Texas, including Cameron.

Our first question (never actually having heard of this plant before) was "What is Jatropha?" From the African Development Bank - Renewable Energy we found an article with that very title: What is Jatropha? It appears that the plant you are most likely asking about is Jatropha curcas, which is native to Central and South America, but has spread all over the world in tropical and sub-tropical climates. This USDA Plant Profile Map shows this plant has been introduced into Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Florida.

Since this is a non-native and out of our realm of plants native to North America, we are going to give you links to some websites to help you answer your own question. We are curious as to why you would want to propagate this plant? It can be invasive, it has serious toxicity, and isn't particularly attractive. Perhaps you're planning home production of biodiesel for the family car?

From General Biodiesel Jatropha curcas: Poison shrub or environmental savior?

Jatropha curcas

Wikipedia Jatropha curcas

Tropilab Inc. Jatropha Curcas - Physic Nut

Pictures

 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Care of Rio Grande Wild Petunia
July 17, 2007 - I have bought the Rio Grande Wild Petunia, Ruellia davisiorum. How should I look after it?
view the full question and answer

Bulb identification
December 10, 2009 - My pinecone ginger (Zingiber zerumbet), my white ginger (Hedychium coronarium) and my cana lilly roots were all accidently put in the same box and now I can't tell which is which. Is there some sort ...
view the full question and answer

Mediterranean Pines indigenous to Verde Valley AZ
January 01, 2012 - Are the tall, thin Mediterranean/Pencil Pines growing in the Verde Valley in Arizona indigenous to the area? They are so plentiful, but are not identified as an indigenous evergreen. If not, how did...
view the full question and answer

Transplant shock in non-native Mexican Ruda
July 14, 2006 - I hope that you can help me. I planted some Mexican Ruda in a large pot. Planted it in good soil. The plant is not doing well. It's droopy and drying out. I watered it every other day. It is in t...
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native Bradford pear in Katy TX
April 24, 2011 - Hi. I have a Bradford Pear that I wrapped during the freeze at the base of the trunk during last years freeze. It is about 4.5 yrs old. The base has cracked and the top is dry and lifeless; however, a...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center