Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - September 15, 2011

From: Raymore, MO
Region: Midwest
Topic: Septic Systems, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Appropriate plants for septic field from Raymore MO
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Is it practical to plant coneflower, garden phlox, etc. on a septic drain field?

ANSWER:

We are frequently asked about appropriate plantings over septic fields. Rather than repeat ourselves, we will link you to several of those previous answers from various parts of the country. The gist of those answers is that grasses and herbaceous blooming plants are good, holding soil and moving moisture to the surface. On the other hand, woody plants such as trees and shrubs are not good; their roots will make a beeline for the septic lines and disrupt them

Previous answer No. 1

Previous answer No. 2 - which also has a number of other links

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern purple coneflower
Echinacea purpurea

Wild blue phlox
Phlox divaricata

More Septic Systems Questions

Tree for on top of sewer lines from San Antonio
March 16, 2013 - I am looking for an evergreen small tree with taproot to plant in a very small front yard near the sidewalk and possibly on top of or nearly on top of sewer lines. Would a Mt. Laurel be the choice? ...
view the full question and answer

Plants for a Septic Field in NC
August 14, 2013 - What kinds of low water plants can I plant over a new septic field in North Carolina? The area is part sun so I am concerned about having trouble getting grass started.
view the full question and answer

Tree roots in sewer from Paragould AR
September 30, 2012 - I have beautiful pecan trees, an apple in the back yard, a pine on the west side of the house and pecan trees in the front yard. Two trees are interrupting my sewer systems (at least one in the back y...
view the full question and answer

Plants that will not clog lateral lines with roots
January 25, 2009 - We recently had to replace the lateral lines for our septic tank because wisteria roots had clogged the drainpipes. The machinery tore up our front and side yard,and we are trying to get them back int...
view the full question and answer

Using bamboo as a filter for odoras from a wastewater treatmen plant in College Station, TX
November 16, 2014 - My wastewater treatment plant is considering planting bamboo to create a filter for odors between it and the neighborhood. Are there any native plant alternatives that would function as well (if not b...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.