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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Friday - August 05, 2011

From: Brady, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants, Cacti and Succulents
Title: Transplanting young Nolina texana plants
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

Mr. SP, I am looking for information relating to transplanting some young Nolina texana. Esp. the best time of the year and whether to replant directly in the ground or .. Thanks,

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants assumes that you are planning to take the young Nolina texana (Texas sacahuista) plants (offshoots) from around the parent plant.  The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Native Plant Database gives the following propagation instructions.  "Take individual offshoots from mature plants in winter. Plant seeds in cold frame or greenhouse in late January (cool weather). Seedlings do best if transplanted into 4-6 inch pots and given light shade the first season." 

Although these plants are very tough, if you transplant offsprings directly from the parent plant into the ground at other locations in the garden in winter make sure that the soil remains moist for several weeks in order for the Nolina roots to catch hold. If keeping the soil moist is a problem on site, an alternative is to transplant into six inch pots until the plants begin to grow.

Nolina texana plants are especially attractive cascading over a slope or retaining wall.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas sacahuista
Nolina texana

Texas sacahuista
Nolina texana

Texas sacahuista
Nolina texana

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