En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - April 18, 2006

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants
Title: Repotting from 4-inch pots
Answered by: Joe Marcus and Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello. A week ago I purchased some native plants at the wildflower center plant sale. I would like to know how to repot these seedlling native plants. They are in 4" pots right now. I have as follows: 4" White Avens, 4" Texas yellow star, 4" Pitcher Sage, 4" Indigo Salvia. What size container should I put all of the above plants? What is the procedure for transplanting these plants? I know what kind of soil to use but would very much appreciate transplanting requirements. Thank you.

ANSWER:

You can move your plants to any size pot up to one-gallon. You can even move them to large planters if you want to to do a mixed planting. Actually, the more soil volume you give the plants the better off they'll be. They won't dry out so quickly and their roots will have more room to grow. When you transplant them, you should be careful to not plant them too deep or too shallow. The top of the root ball should be barely covered with soil—about 1/4 inch. A little root stimulator might help, but they won't want to be heavily fed.

 

More Transplants Questions

Transplanting Trillium in Quebec.
May 13, 2009 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, I live in the Laurentiens of Quebec where they are putting a HWY in my back yard. I have a lot of white trillium that I am wanting to transplant before they start the excava...
view the full question and answer

Pecan tree transplant in Elgin, TX
August 26, 2008 - Hello, Mr. Smarty Plants, I have a question about how to encourage a very young pecan sapling to grow, and whether I should use mulch to do so. I live in Elgin (Bastrop County) and the soil is extr...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for sandy soil and not much water
April 14, 2008 - I am planning a new garden at home and would like to grow native plants that can handle sandy soil and don't need much water. I do not water my gardens.I would prefer plants that can have more than o...
view the full question and answer

Starting transplants of native Pleopeltis polypodioides
January 15, 2009 - I would like to know how to start Pleopeltis polypodioides (resurrection fern) growing in my oak trees. I have a source for the plants but do not know how to start the transplants on the limbs of the...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting non-native yellow lantana in Emerald Isle, NC
August 22, 2010 - We live in Emerald Isle, NC. Can we transplant yellow lantana? It is not really a perennial but appears to be one at the coast. If so, when do you transplant?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center