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Tuesday - July 06, 2010

From: Canyon Lake, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources, Seeds and Seeding
Title: Planting red Columbine and Cedar sage from seed in Canyon Lake, Tx.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I live near Canyon Lake, Texas in the Hill Country. I would like to plant red columbine and cedar sage in the shady areas beneath live oaks and ashe junipers within the limestone soil that is there naturally. Is seed available commercially for both types of plants? Is it wise to start the plants from seed?

ANSWER:

The Red Columbine Aquilegia canadensis (red columbine) and the Cedar Sage Salvia roemeriana (cedar sage) are shade tolerant plants that should thrive in the setting that you describe.

Using our Suppliers Directory can help you find either plants or seeds for many species of native plants. Enter a city name in the Search Location box.

Is it wise to start plants from seeds? That's the way the plants do it. However, many gardeners lack the patience to wait for germination.

With a brief search, I was able to find seed for ony the Red Columbine (Native American Seed). This company also has seed for another red-flowered Salvia, Salvia coccinea (blood sage).

Natives of Texas  near Kerrville has plants of the Cedar Sage and the Red Columbine.

 

From the Image Gallery


Cedar sage
Salvia roemeriana

Eastern red columbine
Aquilegia canadensis

Scarlet sage
Salvia coccinea

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