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Tuesday - May 25, 2010

From: West hartford, CT
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: Growth rate of the American beech tree from West Hartford CT
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What is the growth rate of an American beech tree?

ANSWER:

Our webpage Fagus grandifolia (American beech) in our Native Plant Database does not specifically state a growth rate, but says it can grow from 50 to 80 feet, even a hundred feet, and is long-lived. Usually trees that are long-lived do grow more slowly. In other research material, we found it once referred to as of "medium" growth, whatever that means, and in another "slow growing." You can follow the plant link to our page with descriptions of growing conditions, size, propagation and so forth. We know that it is native to Hartford County CT, with your USDA Hardiness Zone of 6a. Please take note of the suggestion that it be planted during its dormant season, which would be late Fall to very early Spring.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery: 


Fagus grandifolia

Fagus grandifolia

Fagus grandifolia

Fagus grandifolia

 

 

 

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