En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - April 25, 2010

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Shrubs, Vines
Title: Native climbing rose for Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Is there such a thing as a native climbing rose that would do well in Austin?

ANSWER:

When we searched our Native Plant Database on the genus rosa, we found 22 species native to North America, and 9 to Texas. You know, there really is no such thing as a "climbing" rose, in the sense that ivies and trumpet creepers climb with hold-fasts or emitting a sticky substance that causes the branch to cling to a surface. Roses have stiff, straight stems and there are a few species that have very long stiff, straight stems which can be run through trellises or tied up with plant ties. So, of the 9 roses native to Texas, we will be looking for one that has more of a mounding nature than shrub-like.

Rosa setigera (climbing rose) - this  USDA Plant Profile shows this rose, which has 15-ft. long branches, growing in some counties in far northeast Texas and one county several counties south of Travis County. This is the only one of the rosa genus native to Texas that is called a climbing rose, and that comes this close to Travis County.

Pavonia lasiopetala (Texas swampmallow) - this is not a member of the rosa genus, but its common names include "rose pavonia," and "rock rose." It has stems up to 4' tall, grows in Travis County,  the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center sells it in our semi-annual plant sales, as well as using it  in our Gardens.

And that is about the best we can do. As you no doubt know, most roses are of Chinese origin, although they have been cultivated in the New World and Europe for hundreds of years. 

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Rosa setigera

Rosa setigera

Pavonia lasiopetala

Pavonia lasiopetala

 

 

More Shrubs Questions

Evergreen privacy screen in California
February 18, 2015 - Hello, My family and I just bought a house in Paradise CA. I want to.plant privacy plants that are native to northern California. I would like the plant to be green all year but drought resistant if...
view the full question and answer

Landscaping a Fence with Native Plants for Central Texas
March 08, 2013 - I'm looking to landscape my fence that I've lined with woven bamboo. The area gets the hot afternoon sun in summer and is pretty shady in winter. The plants need to be drought and heat tolerant. I'...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for a garden in Panama City, FL
May 10, 2013 - I live in zone 9 in Florida. We are looking for plants which will be attractive all year long for the front of our house's landscaping which faces north. I need a specimen bush which doesn't get ov...
view the full question and answer

Identification of shrub with red berries in Kentucky
January 14, 2012 - I live in Laurel CO, KY. I am trying to identify a shrub/tree. The leaves are green and may turn reddish orange. There are huge pods of red berries hanging.
view the full question and answer

Shrub or Vine for NH Slope
May 11, 2013 - I'm looking for a native plant/shrub/vine that can be used to control erosion on a relatively steep slope in New Hampshire. Do you know of any?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center