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Monday - December 19, 2005

From: Oak Ridge, TN
Region: Southeast
Topic: Herbs/Forbs
Title: General information on native Fendlers sandwort (Arenaria fendeleri)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am trying to locate any general information on Fendler's Sandwort. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

ANSWER:

Fendler's sandwort (Arenaria fendleri) is a member of the Family Caryophyllaceae (Pink Family). It is a plant of the southern Rocky Mountains and grows on cliffs, ledges, and rocky banks. Its distribution is Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. Under its former botanical name, Ergemone fendleri, you can view the description of this plant in eFloras.

 

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