En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Saturday - February 27, 2010

From: Beaumont, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: How will winter weather affect bluebonnets this year?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Just wondering how our winter weather this year will affect the blooming of bluebonnets. When are they expected to be in full bloom and what will be their duration? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants gets lots of questions about bluebonnet bloom time and how the blooms are affected by the weather so I am going to refer you to the answer to a recent question and quote from that question (January 5, 2010) here as well:

"Early April is very consistently the height of the flowering season for Lupinus texensis (Texas bluebonnet) in Central Texas.  Weather conditions can vary the season by just a few days either way, but not enough to really notice.  Weather plays a greater role in the development of any year's Bluebonnet crop.  In general, good fall rains improve the show for the following season.  However, other variables such as germination rate, competing winter grasses, etc, also affect the flower crop."

We have been blessed with very fine rain and even snowfall this winter which should make the bluebonnets and other wildflowers quite spectacular this year.  Look for the bluebonnets to begin showing up on roadsides in March with a peak around the first weekend in April.  There should some blooms still around in the middle of May.  The season shifts a bit as you move north or south from the Austin area.

 

More Wildflowers Questions

Can I grow Texas bluebonnets in Georgia?
May 25, 2010 - Being a native Texan, my mom loves bluebonnets. We live in Georgia, however so I am wondering if I planted some bluebonnets in her yard would they grow? What are the best conditions for bluebonnets ...
view the full question and answer

Why did my Prairie Flax plant die in Austin, TX?
April 27, 2012 - Hello, We planted 4 prairie flax last fall in garden. They were all growing nicely until last month when I found that one of them has completely dried up and died. The plants are planted together a...
view the full question and answer

Is it illegal in Texas to pick bluebonnets? No.
December 01, 2008 - Is it illegal in Texas to pick a bluebonnet?
view the full question and answer

Native Plant Suggestions for Dripping Springs
August 02, 2011 - I have a very dry commercial property in Dripping Springs TX where the dry sand/dust isn't a good rain conductor (whenever we get rain). What can we plant there? We have no irrigation and use a rai...
view the full question and answer

Making a pollinator garden
August 11, 2014 - Hello, I have a ditch right by my house and I want to turn it into a pollinator garden using native plants. My problem is, right now it's so full of weeds that we have to mow those down so soon. For ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center