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Mr. Smarty Plants - What is wrong with the bluebonnets?

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Friday - April 04, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Best of Smarty, Wildflowers
Title: What is wrong with the bluebonnets?
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

This doesn't seem to be a very good year for bluebonnets. What's up with that?

ANSWER:

Sorry 'bout that. You're absolutely right that the bluebonnets are not as spectacular as they were last year. But, think back, the year before that, they were even less impressive. The nature of native wildflowers is that they are programmed to survive. When there is rain in sufficient amounts, the seeds in the ground, some of which may have been there for years, come popping up as quickly as they can. The drive is to reproduce and to permit the species to survive. So, last year, they came up, they bloomed, and we all marvelled. Then, they seeded out, and died. And the appropriate amount of rain at the appropriate time didn't happen this year. Spoiled by last year, the wildflower lovers are sulking some this year. But those seeds are still there, still waiting. It may be next Spring, it may be two or three years, but the seeds will get the rain and germinate and we'll have another great year for bluebonnets. In the meantime, enjoy all the wildflowers that are blooming and will bloom all year. We're awful lucky to be in Texas!

 

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