En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - October 18, 2009

From: Hunt, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Chilopsis linearis Bubba in Hunt TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I purchased 3 desert willows (label: chilopsis linearis) to create an oasis area around a fountain which is in the center of my circle drive. But I need one more. Now I can only find the "chilopsis linearis bubba" variety. Since they're all to be planted close to each other, will the bubba variety stand out as different from the other three? It appeared to me that the bubba variety has shorter/darker green leaves..and I'm not sure what else might be "different". My options: wait to find a match, or get two bubbas and mix two and two? What would you do? Thanks.

ANSWER:

The cultivar (cultivated variety) of Chilopsis linearis (desert willow) 'Bubba' is very little different from the native variety. There will be no damage done by having them grow together in a garden. In fact, the 'Bubba' cultivar ordinarily produces no seed pods, so you won't have to worry about cross pollination. Whether you have all of one species or mix them up is pretty much a matter of personal preference. Personally, we prefer the more natural look of mixing them up, letting them look like they just "grew that way." And we also have a personal preference for an odd number of plants when there is a grouping, 3 or 5, and so forth. But, it's your garden, you just decide what you like, you're in charge.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Blackening of top growth of yaupon in Sunrise Beach TX
June 09, 2010 - My question regards a Will Flemming yaupon which I am thinking may be within your scope of expertise. These were recently planted under windy conditions, then hit with a neighbors antiquated jet type ...
view the full question and answer

Leaves falling off recently transplanted mature Mountain Laurel
July 05, 2006 - I have recently purchased a Mountain Laurel for my backyard landscaping. It is a fully matured ML standing over 9 feet tall by 6 feet wide. Since it was planted (about 6 weeks ago) it has been losin...
view the full question and answer

Black coloration on Star Magnolia is probably sooty mold.
November 21, 2008 - I have a star magnolia where 90% of the bark has turned black. It almost looks burned. The tree has decent buds set for next spring. What is causing the bark to turn black?
view the full question and answer

Native trees safe for cattle in Waller TX
October 27, 2009 - I have a ranch where the pastures have no trees. Can you recommend native species which as safe for cattle and relatively maintenance free?
view the full question and answer

Problems with Acer rubrum in Sacramento
September 06, 2009 - We live in Sacramento California and have two seven year old Magenta Maple trees in our front yard that are planted about 65 feet from each other. This is the second year in a row that the tree on th...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center