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Monday - August 03, 2009

From: Hillsboro, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Fast growing tree for pasture in Coolidge, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, we purchased some land around Coolidge Tx., it has NO trees on it. This is open pasture land, can you suggest a fairly fast growing tree for shade? And if you know can you give us some names of business' that sale this and other types of trees.. We are ~ 60 miles south of Dallas/Ft Worth. Thank you very much.

ANSWER:

You can make your own selection for fast growing native trees for Limestone County by using the Texas Tree Selector from the Texas Forest Service.

Here are a few suggestions from the database for shade trees that grow rapidly:

Ulmus americana (American elm) up to 80 feet and more information

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) up to 30 feet and more information

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar)  usually 30 to 40 feet but can reach 90 feet and more information

Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) up to 60 feet and more information

Quercus shumardii (Shumard's oak) 50 to 90 feet and more information

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) 75 to 100 feet and more information

Visit our National Suppliers Directory to find nurseries that specialize in native plants in your area.


Ulmus americana

Cercis canadensis

Juniperus virginiana

Pinus taeda

Quercus shumardii

Platanus occidentalis

 

 


 

 

 

 

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