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Friday - June 05, 2009

From: Georgetown, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Sources for Calyptocarpus vialis and Dalea greggii.
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What are sources for 4" horseherb and gregg dalea? I've tried nurseries listed with NPSOT. Also, would using the above and maybe wooly stemodia and/or frogfruit together become a problem?

ANSWER:

Please visit our National Suppliers Directory to search for nurseries in your area that specialize in native plants.  Many of these suppliers have links to webpages with lists of available plants and/or e-mail addresses.  They all have telephone numbers to contact them.  If you can wait until the first weekend in October (Oct. 9—Members Preview, Oct. 10 and 11—General Public), the Wildflower Center Fall Plant Sale & Gardening Festival usually has Calyptocarpus vialis (straggler daisy or horseherb) and Dalea greggii (Gregg's prairie clover) for sale.  As for being together with Phyla nodiflora (Texas frogfruit) and Stemodia lanata (woolly stemodia), I suppose that one or two of the species could overwhelm and dominate the others, but I'm not absolutely sure which might outcompete the others.  However, Woolly stemodia is native to South Texas along the coast; Gregg's dalea's distribution is the Big Bend area of Texas; frogfruit is native to a large part of Texas (including Williamson County); and horseherb has a distribution similar to frogfruit; and .  So, if I were going to guess which would outcompete the others, I would bet on frogfruit and horseherb in Georgetown, Texas.

 

 

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