En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - April 21, 2009

From: Denton, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Cherry trees in the North Texas area
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Will cherry trees grow well in the North Texas area?

ANSWER:

In our Native Plant Database, we found five members of the Prunus genus native to Texas and referred to as black cherry as a common name.

Prunus serotina (black cherry) - USDA Plant Profile with a few North Central Texas counties where this tree grows

Prunus serotina var. eximia (black cherry) - USDA Plant Profile showing only few counties in South Central Texas

Prunus serotina var. rufula (black cherry) - USDA did not have a county breakdown on this tree. Texas A&M Horticulture site on Southwestern Black Cherry says it grows in canyons and bottomlands of Trans Pecos in West Texas, and has not done well in the Dallas-Ft. Worth Area

Prunus serotina var. virens (black cherry) - USDA Plant Profile shows this growing only in far West Texas, in the Big Bend area

Prunus virginiana (chokecherry) - USDA Plant Profile shows this grown only in a few counties in the northern Texas Panhandle and far West Texas

It looks like your best bet is Prunus serotina (black cherry), so we'll do a little more research on it. You can follow the plant link to our webpage on that individual tree, or see this USDA Forest Service site on the maintenance and problems of the tree.


Prunus serotina

Prunus serotina

Prunus serotina

Prunus serotina

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Florida law on removing orange trees
March 24, 2007 - I live in a co-op mobile home park with a board of directors that tell me that if I have to cut down my orange tree that Florida law says that I have to replace it with another orange tree. I say that...
view the full question and answer

Pruning live oak in Austin
April 28, 2012 - Hi, We recently purchased a house in South Austin and there is a huge Live Oak Tree about 6 feet from the back door (so so so love it!) The only real issues I have so far are: 1. Needing to trim a ...
view the full question and answer

Ornamental grasses under desert willows from Dallas, TX
September 06, 2013 - I am planning on planting 3 desert willows in full sun, below the power lines at the back of my back yard in the White Rock Lake area of Dallas. I would like to plant some ornamental grasses in the be...
view the full question and answer

Problems with Monterrey Oak in Austin
March 26, 2013 - We had a local tree service plant two Monterrey Oak trees on 4/2/2012. At the time we noticed that woodpeckers had had a field day on the trunk bark of both trees with the most damage being on the lar...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for Texarkana, TX
March 31, 2011 - I've been searching for a dependable list of attractive north east native plants, for gardens, landscaping, etc. Specifically, native flowers and shrubs.
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center