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Monday - March 02, 2009

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pruning, Seasonal Tasks
Title: Removal of Carolina Jasmine in San Antonio
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We are attempting to permanently remove large old-growth Carolina Yellow Jasmine, Gelsemium sempervirens bushes from our property. The bushes are cut down. Any suggestions for stump/root removal (mechanical and/or chemical) would be much appreciated. We love the LBJWC; just joined last year! Thanks for all you do there. :)

ANSWER:

Thanks for the nice words; we love what we do here, too.

Although native, you obviously already know that Gelsemium sempervirens (evening trumpetflower) can be invasive and persistent. It is a very tough plant, with no particular insect or disease enemies, and will continue  to attempt to survive. Preventing it from seeding this year was your first step, since you have already taken out the bushes. Constant attention, watching for suckers and yanking them out, is the next step. Stump grinding is probably not practical in an enclosed area, but you could certainly consult with someone who does this and see if it's feasible. You can hand dig along the root system, cutting it at intervals to try to starve the plant, but this is going to take a while. Even though the bushes have been cut down, try making a fresh cut as close to the soil as possible, and immediately painting the fresh cut, within 5 minutes before it seals itself, with an herbicide recommended for this purpose. In other words, attacking on several fronts will finally discourage the plant, but never relax, it won't go away voluntarily.

 

 

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