Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - March 02, 2009

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pruning, Seasonal Tasks
Title: Removal of Carolina Jasmine in San Antonio
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We are attempting to permanently remove large old-growth Carolina Yellow Jasmine, Gelsemium sempervirens bushes from our property. The bushes are cut down. Any suggestions for stump/root removal (mechanical and/or chemical) would be much appreciated. We love the LBJWC; just joined last year! Thanks for all you do there. :)

ANSWER:

Thanks for the nice words; we love what we do here, too.

Although native, you obviously already know that Gelsemium sempervirens (evening trumpetflower) can be invasive and persistent. It is a very tough plant, with no particular insect or disease enemies, and will continue  to attempt to survive. Preventing it from seeding this year was your first step, since you have already taken out the bushes. Constant attention, watching for suckers and yanking them out, is the next step. Stump grinding is probably not practical in an enclosed area, but you could certainly consult with someone who does this and see if it's feasible. You can hand dig along the root system, cutting it at intervals to try to starve the plant, but this is going to take a while. Even though the bushes have been cut down, try making a fresh cut as close to the soil as possible, and immediately painting the fresh cut, within 5 minutes before it seals itself, with an herbicide recommended for this purpose. In other words, attacking on several fronts will finally discourage the plant, but never relax, it won't go away voluntarily.

 

 

More Pruning Questions

Runaway growth on mountain laurel in Coolidge AZ
July 01, 2010 - I have 2 mountain laurels. They are thriving well. In fact one is growing way too fast. I am growing it as a tree, but the branches are in excess of 6 feet, while the trunk is only 18 or so inches. I ...
view the full question and answer

Clipping of beans from newly planted Tecoma stans
April 22, 2008 - I purchased a Esperanza Plant in a pot from a nursery in April of 2008. We planted it and it is doing fine, but came with blooms and beans. Do I need to do clip or prune the beans at this stage of g...
view the full question and answer

Leggy purple coneflower
August 20, 2007 - Last year I planted purple coneflowers and this year when they bloomed they were extremely tall & leggy. I'd like next year to get them to be shorter and fuller. How do I do that & is it something ...
view the full question and answer

Pruning tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera)
June 05, 2009 - Thank you for your answer regarding when my tulip tree will flower. I also understand it can/will grow to over 100 feet so should we be pruning it a certain way to keep it contained? thank you
view the full question and answer

Mystic Spires salvia in transplant shock
July 04, 2008 - Hello. I live in Taylor, Tx. Just outside Austin, Texas. I recently planted mystic spires. One gallons and will receive the hot afternoon sun. All the research says they can tolerate this location. Th...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.