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Thursday - October 09, 2008

From: Mattapoisett, MA
Region: Northeast
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagating mimosa from seed
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a seed pod from a Mimosa tree. What is the best way to start this beautiful tree from seed. Thank you!

ANSWER:

There are mimosa plants (Genus Mimosa) that are native to North America, but I suspect you are referring to the non-native, invasive mimosa, also called silk tree (Albizia julibrissin).  Our expertise is in the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.  Because the mimosa is invasive we would urge you not to propagate its seed.  We would encourage you to consider a substitue for it—for example, Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud), Cornus alternifolia (alternateleaf dogwood), Cornus florida (flowering dogwood), Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood), Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel), Rhododendron calendulaceum (flame azalea), Rhus copallinum (winged sumac) or Sorbus americana (American mountain ash).

Cercis canadensis

Cornus alternifolia

Cornus florida

Cornus sericea

Kalmia latifolia

Rhododendron calendulaceum

Rhus copallinum

Sorbus americana

 

 

 

 

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