En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - August 24, 2008

From: Aledo, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Getting rid of rain lilies in Aledo, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How do I get rain lilies to stop growing in my yard?

ANSWER:

It was brought to our attention, after this answer was published, by a smarter member of the Mr. Smarty Plants team than this one, that the rain lilies in this case are probably native Cooperia drummondii (evening rainlily), rather than the non-native Zephyranthes grandiflora. Rain lilies seem to be so popular you might be able to get rid of them by offering them free to anyone who wants to come and dig them out. It would be well to stipulate that they dig the bulbs out with the smallest possible interference with the other plants in your garden. They bloom, and then they disappear so quickly, it doesn't seem they would be that much of a nuisance. If you're still determined they have to go, pop the bulbs out of the ground and dispose of them yourself. Mowing them, or cutting off the tops, will not deter them, since they are bulbs, with food stored up in the bulb, waiting for the first good day to start growing again.


Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

Cooperia drummondii

 

 

More Herbs/Forbs Questions

Is the Obedient Plant a bog plant?
August 16, 2008 - I purchased 2 obedient plants at a farmer's market in Michigan. As I was unfamiliar with this plant, the merchant told me it did well in full sun. It was just what I needed. When I got home I look...
view the full question and answer

Plants for oak shade from Whitney TX
December 24, 2012 - I live in Whitney, Texas and have a number of beautiful Live Oak trees in a portion of my yard providing deep shade. Asian Jasmine grows in about 5 ft circle around them and then nothing! I have walk ...
view the full question and answer

Tradescantia as a water plant
June 13, 2007 - I have a spiderwort plant, and when I found it at the nursery, it was in water by the pond plants, (I had no idea what kind of plant it was at the time) So I bought it, took it home, and repotted it w...
view the full question and answer

How to use seaweed for mulch and fertilizer
September 24, 2009 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants,I live on the Peconic Bay, Greenport, Long Island. We have an oyster farm and lots of seaweed. I've read that seaweed was used on farms in the past as mulch (fertilizer?). ...
view the full question and answer

Need native plants to place in chicken coop in Charolette, NC
September 20, 2014 - Hi, I live near Charlotte, NC. I'm looking for native plants that I can plant in my chicken coop that will produce food for the chickens. If they also produced some delicious food for me, I wouldn't...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center