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Sunday - March 30, 2008

From: Yuma, AZ
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Viability of buffalo grass in Yuma, AZ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Will Buffalo Grass grow in Yuma, AZ, where the temperature can go as high as 120 degrees in the summer?

ANSWER:

You might want to begin by reading this article on Native Lawns from our How-to Articles. It specifically discusses buffalograss, its planting and care.

We checked first in the USDA Plant Profile for Bouteloua dactyloides (buffalograss). While it appears that buffalograss does grow in Arizona, it is not shown as growing in Yuma County, in the southwest corner of Arizona. This may not be a complete picture, as the Plant Profile is sometimes out of date. We could find no upper limit on the temperature buffalograss could withstand, but it is said to be heat-resistant. One consideration might be whether the lawn will be irrigated. You will note from the webpage on buffalograss that it can withstand drought, but may need some irrigation in long, hot, dry spells. Some of the counties in Arizona are farther south than Yuma, and appear to have buffalograss growing.

To get information from plant people closer to home, try this site from the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension office for Yuma County.


Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

 

 

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