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Saturday - November 03, 2007

From: Wimberley, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Small plants for space between stones on a path
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We've just installed a stone path (unmortared) near our house and are looking for plants/seeds that would do well in the gaps between the flagstones. Naturally they need to be very low growing and handle light foot traffic. The path is about 50/50 full sun and part sun. The path base is sand but I can put in about an inch of soil in the gaps Thanks!

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks these three plants, alone or in combination, would be just the ticket:

Calyptocarpus vialis (straggler daisy)

Phyla nodiflora (Texas frogfruit)

Dichondra carolinensis (Carolina ponysfoot)

You might also consider one of the sedges, such as Carex planostachys (cedar sedge) or Carex texensis (Texas sedge), although they might be a little taller than you were wanting.


Calyptocarpus vialis

Calyptocarpus vialis

Phyla nodiflora

Carex texensis

 

 


 

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