En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - October 18, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders
Title: Flameleaf sumac problems
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have three flameleaf sumacs, which were planted last December. One is doing very well, but two are losing their leaves. First, black spots appear on the leaves, then the leaves turn yellow and wilt, and then they turn black and fall off. Can you offer any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Rhus copallinum (winged sumac), also called flameleaf sumac, is considered a drought and pest resistant native shrub, excellent for this area. However, we had a very strange summer, with a lot of cool weather and moisture for two months and then summer came back with a vengeance and doesn't seem planning to leave. Mr. Smarty Plants was asked a similar question about a relative of the Flameleaf sumac, Rhus virens (Evergreen sumac) and you can follow this link to our answer. As we noted in that answer, it could be that the plants in your garden need some trimming for more air, and checking their drainage to make sure they are not standing in soggy soil. Because it is a native, the sumac usually gets along very well in this part of the country. Another consideration is that the Rhus copallinum (winged sumac) is deciduous as opposed to the Evergreen sumac, which is not. Perhaps partly because of the weather this year, your sumacs may have chosen to drop their leaves a little early. Hopefully, time, patience, normal (for Texas) weather, and perhaps a little attention to drainage around the roots of your plants will get everything back to what you expected from your plants.

 


Rhus copallinum

 

 

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Need help with my 25 yr old Mountain Ash in Clinton Township, MI.
July 11, 2011 - For the first time our 25yr old mountain ash tree has dying branches, we removed one branch and it seems to have spread to other branches? What should we do?
view the full question and answer

Salvia, geum transplant shock symptoms
July 21, 2006 - I need some help. I transplanted 2 xeriscape plants and they are not doing well. 1 is Pitcher Sage-sorry I don't know botanical name; the other is White Avens. The've grown a lot but all the leave...
view the full question and answer

Gaura Plants Dying In PA
July 16, 2014 - I had six gaura plants. They were beautiful last year. Now I have one that is doing well and the others are dying slowly one at a time. I don't understand this. They are on a slight slope and have ...
view the full question and answer

Diagnosis of problem with Parsley hawthorn
August 06, 2007 - I have a Crataegus marshallii (Parsley hawthorn) that is about 3 years old. It leafed out this spring and flowered lightly. As the summer has progressed, though, the leaves have been dropping premat...
view the full question and answer

Is yellow tulip poplar alive from Gilbertsville PA
March 30, 2013 - How can I tell if my yellow tulip poplar is alive? thank you
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center