En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - July 04, 2007

From: Syracuse, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Non-Natives, Vines
Title: Care of Passiflora incarnata or Passiflora coccinea
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Hi- I have two passionflowers, one red, one purple. I live in upstate NY. They grow very well up onto trellises, however, they have stopped producing flowers. Both are planted in pots (fairly large) and receive part shade but mostly sun. I have fed miracle grow...any suggestions on how to increase their blooms??

ANSWER:

Our focus and expertise are native plants of North America. It is possible that your purple passionflower is Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower). Its range goes as far north as Pennsylvania, but any red flowering passionflower is going to be a non-native tropical species such as Passiflora coccinea.

Based on our knowledge of the native passionflowers, we can offer the following advice. For vines like these, too much shade and a nitrogen level that is too high are the usual culprits for lack of flowering. You should back off on the fertilizer and make sure that they're getting enough light.


Passiflora incarnata
 

More Vines Questions

Promoting bloom of crossvine
January 05, 2008 - I planted a crossvine a couple of years ago and it has grown quite well, climbing well up the Mesquite tree it was planted under. However, it has never bloomed. I was really looking forward to those...
view the full question and answer

Fruit crops to grow in Tennessee mountains
May 27, 2013 - My property has a lot of rock formations throughout it and has hundreds of cedars where it is not pasture. I am wanting to grow fruit trees and berry bushes but don't know what can grow in this e...
view the full question and answer

Plants to trail down wall in South Carolina
February 07, 2008 - Good day, I am putting in a stacked mortarless concrete block retaining wall which will rise to the forest floor along a cut bank - about 4 feet high. Each course steps back about one inch from th...
view the full question and answer

Eradicating trumpet vine runners in Austin
April 29, 2012 - How do I eradicate trumpet vine runners from my lawn? Will it kill my pecan tree?
view the full question and answer

Rash from non-native potato vines
July 21, 2010 - Here in No. CA we have two potato vines that over the last 5-6 years have flourished gloriously. Just this year, we went to prune them (as we normally do once or twice a year), and both my husband an...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center