En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - April 28, 2007

From: longview, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Managing Roadsides
Title: Planting bluebonnets along highway
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We are in the process of fencing our land located on a main highway. We are supposed to fence 80ft. from the center of the highway. That is a lot of land just sitting there. I wanted to know since we can't fence it, will we be able to plant Texas bluebonnets along the highway? and also will the state highway mower go around the bluebonnets when they mow along the highway? Also, are they any laws governing where and who can plant the state flower?

ANSWER:

If you are planning on planting bluebonnets on your own land, you don't need the permission of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). If you want to sow bluebonnet seeds on the highway right-of-way, however, you should consult with your Tyler District Office of TxDOT. They would also be the entity to contact to find out about mowing schedules and policy. You can read more about TxDOT's wildflower planting and maintenance programs on their web page.

To help you with your project, Mr. Smarty Plants recommends that you read "How to Grow Bluebonnets", "Planting Wildflowers along Roadsides", and "Large Scale Wildflower Planting" from our How to Articles web page.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

More Managing Roadsides Questions

Liriope spicata for erosion and dust suppression from Bonifay FL
August 16, 2011 - I want to plant Liriope 'spicata'. I know it can be aggressive and that's what I want. We live on dirt road and need something by road for help in erosion and it's also hard to mow this are...
view the full question and answer

Roadside plants as absorbers of carbon dioxide
February 13, 2007 - If plants absorb carbon dioxide why aren't they on a list of things to do to combat Global Warming? If we had more plants on the sides of our roads and highways would it help?
view the full question and answer

Digging wild buttercup from roadside in Mechanicsville MD
May 28, 2012 - Mr. Smarty Plants, is it illegal to dig out wild buttercup in Maryland? I see them along the dirt road or just in the ditch. Since buttercup considered weed, I'm wondering what the law say about this...
view the full question and answer

Prairie Paintbrush and Managing Roadsides
April 26, 2005 - I have been visiting a piece of land beside I-35 for quite a few years now.  It is home to tons of different plants, but it really has a fantastic show of Prairie Paintbrush - the multicolored ones, n...
view the full question and answer

Winter snow and road salt in Michigan
June 27, 2010 - I have been asked to select plants for an area in zone5/6 that suffers from snow load and street salt during winters. The area is about 15x18 and has a deciduous tree in the center. Grass, which did ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center