En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Propagation and transplanting of Vernonia lindheimeri

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - April 10, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants
Title: Propagation and transplanting of Vernonia lindheimeri
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Sean Watson

QUESTION:

I have located a wooly ironweed plant and have taken some seeds to start. This is the only ironweed I have seen. Any suggestions on how to start the seed? Also, if development of the property appears to destroy the plant, what is the best time of year to transplant it?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants asked Sean Watson, our Propagation Specialist here at the Wildflower Center, about the propagation of Vernonia lindheimeri (woolly ironweed). Here is what he said:

"The germination of Vernonia species is typically low. I usually sow the seed thickly. It is usually winter sowing, either indoors or in a cold frame, that takes twelve weeks for the seedlings to develop to a size for permanent planting. This time can be cut in half by sowing stored seed (stored at 40 degrees for ~ 12 weeks) in May-July when soil temps are consistently warm. They tend to grow faster/germinate better in warmer temps."

The best time to transplant ironweed is when it is winter dormant (mid-December to early-February). However, if you see that the development that will destroy the plant is about to occur, then you should transplant it then no matter what time of year it happens to be.


Vernonia lindheimeri

 

 

More Propagation Questions

Planting instructions for Ilex verticillata in Wisconsin
September 02, 2008 - We have a winterberry tree and we would like to grow another one in a different area. Can we transplant part of that or do we need to start from scratch? How would we know what the male plant looks li...
view the full question and answer

Stubs of Texas Star Hibiscus in Abilene, TX
March 26, 2009 - We have cut back our outdoor Texas Star Hibiscus for 4 years and now have a large number of old stubs that the new growth must navigate around. Will it kill the plant if we dig up the old stubs? At so...
view the full question and answer

How to grow milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) for monarch butterflies
March 31, 2010 - I tried and tried and tried to grow Asclepias viridis, A. asperula and even A. oenotheroides from seeds and even tubers for fourteen years! Do you have advice for growing these and other milkweed plan...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting azalea sprouts in St Louis MO
August 27, 2009 - I have an azalea bush that I cut back severely 2 years ago and unwittingly started 3 or 4 new bushes when some limbs grew back along the ground and created their own roots. I'd like to separate them...
view the full question and answer

What to do with 200 yucca seedlings in Sandusky, OH?
August 31, 2013 - I have over two hundred 3 month old yucca seedlings from my last yr. Yucca plants. I soaked the the seeds for 24 hrs. planted them in trays and now they are abt. 2 inch tall. My question is, should I ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center