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Tuesday - April 10, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants
Title: Propagation and transplanting of Vernonia lindheimeri
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Sean Watson

QUESTION:

I have located a wooly ironweed plant and have taken some seeds to start. This is the only ironweed I have seen. Any suggestions on how to start the seed? Also, if development of the property appears to destroy the plant, what is the best time of year to transplant it?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants asked Sean Watson, our Propagation Specialist here at the Wildflower Center, about the propagation of Vernonia lindheimeri (woolly ironweed). Here is what he said:

"The germination of Vernonia species is typically low. I usually sow the seed thickly. It is usually winter sowing, either indoors or in a cold frame, that takes twelve weeks for the seedlings to develop to a size for permanent planting. This time can be cut in half by sowing stored seed (stored at 40 degrees for ~ 12 weeks) in May-July when soil temps are consistently warm. They tend to grow faster/germinate better in warmer temps."

The best time to transplant ironweed is when it is winter dormant (mid-December to early-February). However, if you see that the development that will destroy the plant is about to occur, then you should transplant it then no matter what time of year it happens to be.


Vernonia lindheimeri

 

 

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