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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Wednesday - July 02, 2014

From: Albany, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Groundcovers, Shade Tolerant
Title: Groundcover for part shade in Albany NY
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello! I'm looking for: a native ground cover, mostly shade with only some morning sun, on a slope, edible is preferred but not necessity, mostly clay type soil for the Albany, NY area. Thanks for your help!

ANSWER:

The following are native plants that grow in Albany County, New York or an adjacent county and would make good groundcovers:

Carex blanda (Eastern woodland sedge) Here is more information from Evergreen Native Plant Database.

Fragaria virginiana (Virginia strawberry) is edible.  Here is more information from Illinois Wildflowers.

Lycopodium digitatum (Fan clubmoss)  Here is more information from Plants of Southern New Jersey.

Phlox divaricata (Wild blue phlox)  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Potentilla simplex (Common cinquefoil) is edible.   Here is more information from Alternative Nature Online Herbal.

Rubus pubescens (Dwarf red blackberry) is edible but needs moisture to grow well.   Here is more information from Northern Ontario Plant Database.

Sedum ternatum (Woodland stonecrop)  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern woodland sedge
Carex blanda

Virginia strawberry
Fragaria virginiana

Fan clubmoss
Lycopodium digitatum

Wild blue phlox
Phlox divaricata

Common cinquefoil
Potentilla simplex

Dwarf red blackberry
Rubus pubescens

Woodland stonecrop
Sedum ternatum

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