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Mr. Smarty Plants - Climbing vines for partial shade in North Texas

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Thursday - June 12, 2014

From: Mansfield, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Vines
Title: Climbing vines for partial shade in North Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I've read your recommendations for climbing vines in partial-shade, but requestor was from Central Texas (Austin-area). Would those recommendations hold true for North Texas (DFW area)?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is not sure whether you meant this question, this question, this question, this question or this question—or perhaps another question.  There are several vines that are common to those answers.  I will give you the ones that would be best suited to your area.  The following vines grow in, adjacent to or within two counties of Tarrant County:

Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle) is evergreen.  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Lonicera albiflora (Western white honeysuckle)  Here is more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina jessamine) is evergreen.  Here is more information from North Carolina State University.

Clematis drummondii (Drummond's clematis)  Here is more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Clematis pitcheri (Purple clematis)  Here is more information from Aggie Horticulture.

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper)  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Passiflora incarnata (Purple passionflower)  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) will grow in part shade but will not produce as many blooms without full sun.  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Garden.

Vitis mustangensis (Mustang grape) should produce edible fruit.   Here is more information from Foraging Texas.

Vitis vulpina (Frost grape) also produces edible fruit.   Here is more information from Carolina Nature.

 

From the Image Gallery


Coral honeysuckle
Lonicera sempervirens

Western white honeysuckle
Lonicera albiflora

Carolina jessamine
Gelsemium sempervirens

Drummond's clematis
Clematis drummondii

Purple clematis
Clematis pitcheri

Virginia creeper
Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Purple passionflower
Passiflora incarnata

Trumpet creeper
Campsis radicans

Mustang grape
Vitis mustangensis

Frost grape
Vitis vulpina

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