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Saturday - June 07, 2014

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Problem Plants, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Eliminating silverleaf nightshade from Albuquerque NM
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have silverleaf nightshade in my yard and would like to eradicate it (yeah, I know, good luck!) or at least control it. Do you have any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Well, having followed this link, Solanum elaeagnifolium (Silverleaf nightshade),  to our webpage on the plant, we sure can't blame you for wanting to get rid of the plant. Poisonous, agressive, with stinging hairs, it just doesn't seem to have any redeeming features, does it?  

According to this USDA Plant Profile Map, Solanum elaeagnifolium (Silverleaf nightshade) grows natively in a large portion of mid and western America, including Bernalillo County in New Mexico. From the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board:

"How does it reproduce?

Silverleaf nightshade reproduces by seed, rhizomes and root fragments.

How do I control it?

Mechanical Control

Hand-pull or dig plants, being careful to get all of the rootstock and dispose of the plants properly in the trash. Plants can re-grow after being clipped or mowed.

Herbicide Control

Silverleaf nightshade is difficult to control with herbicide because of its root system. Please refer to the PNW Weed Management Handbook, or contact your county noxious weed coordinator."

So, let's pretend this is poison ivy. We are going to quote directly from a previous answer and all you need to do is replace the words "poison ivy" with "silverleaf nightshade" each time you see them. The first supply you need is a pair of heavy-duty rubber gloves - these will protect your hands and lower arms from the poison and can be washed off before you allow the toxic fluids to follow you into the house. The next thing to do is never to let the flowers survive long enough to set seed, since this plant can reproduce just about every way a plant can reproduce. Take the whole flower, put it in a plastic trash bag and send it to the dump. Now, on to the mechanics of getting rid of the rest of the stuff:

"Vigilance and persistence are the keys.  If you can dig or pull up the roots of the plants, you are going to be able to get rid of the plants more quickly.   That will take a great deal of effort and you might not be able or willing to do this.  If you can't or don't want to make the effort to try and dig up roots, your best strategy is the following: 

  • Every time you see a new poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac plant emerge in your yard, cut it off near the ground and IMMEDIATELY (using a small paintbrush--the small foam ones work well) paint the cut with the poison ivy Roundup or equivalent.  (Clorox is not likely to be particulary effective.)   You need to paint it as soon as you cut it because, as a means of defense against disease or insect infestation, plant cells close off wounds quickly and the herbicide won't be transferred to the roots.
  • Wrap the cutoff portion in a plastic bag and dispose of it.
  • Keep careful watch for new plants and act when you see them.  It will take a while, but it will eventually rid your yard of the poisonous pests.

Remember to read and follow the safety precautions listed on the label of the herbicide.   Wear long sleeves, long pants, shoes, socks and gloves to keep from getting the poisonous oils on your skin.

Please check the answer to a previous question about eliminating poison ivy with more detailed instructions as well as methods to avoid."

Good luck and our deepest sympathy!

 

From the Image Gallery


Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

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