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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - March 03, 2014

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Vines
Title: When will non-native Confederate Jasmine bloom in Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have 2 large Confederate Jasmine plants growing in 3 gallon pots on either side of an arbor I built for my friends wedding. The wedding is in 1 month and I'm wondering if this jasmine typically blooms in March in Austin, Texas? The plants have been growing well on the arbor for about a year and have nearly covered it.

ANSWER:

Trachelospermum jasminoides (Star or Confederate jasmine) is native to southeastern Asia and is also not really a member of the Jasminoides (Jasmine) family, but the Apocynaceae (Dogbane) family. More information and pictures from Floridata.

Because the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which it is being grown, we have no information on this plant in our Native Plant Database.

From SFGate, here is an article on The Flowering Season for Star Jasmine.

Both links we gave you designate May as the month the plant begins blooming, but since it is evergreen it should still make a nice backdrop for the wedding.

 

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