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Ranunculus macranthus (Large buttercup) | NPIN
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Ranunculus macranthus (Large buttercup)
Marcus, Joseph A.

Ranunculus macranthus

Ranunculus macranthus Scheele

Large buttercup

Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)

Synonym(s): Ranunculus fascicularis var. cuneiformis, Ranunculus macranthus var. typicus

USDA Symbol: rama3

USDA Native Status: L48 (N)

This is a clumped perennial with bright-yellow, fragrant, cup-shaped flowers. The long-stalked blossoms often appear semi-doubled. Large buttercup stems can be erect and 1 ft. tall or reclining and 3 ft. long. Its stem leaves are densely hairy and deeply cleft, while the basal leaves are cut into leaflets.

This is one of the largest-flowered native buttercups.

 

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Herb
Fruit:
Size Class: 1-3 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Yellow
Bloom Time: Mar , Apr

Distribution

USA: AZ , NM , TX
Native Distribution: S.w. U.S. & Mex.
Native Habitat: Prairie, Plains, Meadows, Pastures, Savannahs, Woodlands edge, Opening

Growing Conditions

Water Use: Medium
Light Requirement: Sun
Soil Moisture: Moist
Soil pH: Acidic (pH<6.8)
Soil Description: Rich, wet soils. Sandy, Sandy Loam, Medium Loam, Clay Loam, Clay
Conditions Comments: This is one of the largest flowered native buttercups. The large butter-yellow flowers and attractive foliage of this plant immediately attract the eye. Prefers moist soil.

Benefit

Use Ornamental: Pocket prairie, Wildflower meadow, Bog or pond area
Warning: POISONOUS PARTS: All parts. Low toxicity if eaten. Minor skin irritation lasting minutes if touched. Symptoms include burning of the mouth, abdominal pain, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. Skin redness, burning sensation, and blisters following contact with cell sap. Toxic Principle: Protoanemonin, released from the glycoside ranunculin.(Poisonous Plants of N.C.)
Conspicuous Flowers: yes
Interesting Foliage: yes
Nectar Source: yes
Deer Resistant: High

Propagation

Description: Easily raised from seed.
Seed Collection: Collect seed in May or June. Falls quickly after maturing so watch closely.
Commercially Avail: yes

National Wetland Indicator Status

Region:AGCPAKAWCBEMPGPHIMWNCNEWMVE
Status: FACW FACW
This information is derived from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Wetland Plant List, Version 3.1 (Lichvar, R.W. 2013. The National Wetland Plant List: 2013 wetland ratings. Phytoneuron 2013-49: 1-241). Click here for map of regions.

From the National Organizations Directory

According to the species list provided by Affiliate Organizations, this plant is on display at the following locations:

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - Austin, TX

Bibliography

Bibref 765 - McMillen's Texas Gardening: Wildflowers (1998) Howard, D.
Bibref 281 - Shinners & Mahler's Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas (1999) Diggs, G. M.; B. L. Lipscomb; B. O'Kennon; W. F...
Bibref 328 - Wildflowers of Texas (2003) Ajilvsgi, Geyata.
Bibref 286 - Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country (1989) Enquist, M.

Search More Titles in Bibliography

Additional resources

USDA: Find Ranunculus macranthus in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Ranunculus macranthus in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Ranunculus macranthus

Metadata

Record Modified: 2007-01-01
Research By: TWC Staff

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