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Zinnia acerosa (Desert zinnia) | NPIN
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Zinnia acerosa (Desert zinnia)
Bransford, W.D. and Dolphia

Zinnia acerosa

Zinnia acerosa (DC.) A. Gray

Desert zinnia, Dwarf zinnia, Dwarf white zinnia

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Synonym(s): Zinnia pumila

USDA Symbol: ZIAC

USDA Native Status: L48 (N)

Dwarf zinnia usually grows 4–10 inches tall with numerous branches and many narrow leaves, 3/4–1 1/2 inches long. The flower heads have 5–7 white to off-white ray flowers, and yellow disc flowers. The ray flowers are lightly toothed at the tip. The plant has a long blooming period (248).

The genus “zinnia” was named by Linneas in honor of Johann Gottfried Zinn. Zinn was a German anatomist, ophthalmologist, and botanist born in 1727 and died in 1759 (in Germany). He was extraordinary professor of medicine and director of the botanical gardens in the university town of Gottingen. He was one of the first to render an accurate description of the eyeball and he investigated the vessels and nerves of the eye cavity. He collected seeds of Z. elegans (from which the garden Zinnia descends) in Mexico. There he was accosted by bandits who, after searching his bag, left him alone, believing him crazy and therefore unlucky.

 

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Herb
Flower:
Fruit:
Size Class: 0-1 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: White
Bloom Time: Jun , Jul , Aug

Distribution

USA: AZ , NM , TX , UT
Native Habitat: Prairie, Plains, Meadows, Pastures, Savannahs

Growing Conditions

Water Use: Low
Light Requirement: Sun
Soil Moisture: Dry
Soil pH: Acidic (pH<6.8)
Soil Description: Rocky

Benefit

Warning: The leaves and bulbs are poisonous, as are the bulbs of many members of the lily family. Sensitivity to a toxin varies with a person’s age, weight, physical condition, and individual susceptibility. Children are most vulnerable because of their curiosity and small size. Toxicity can vary in a plant according to season, the plant’s different parts, and its stage of growth; and plants can absorb toxic substances, such as herbicides, pesticides, and pollutants from the water, air, and soil.
Conspicuous Flowers: yes
Deer Resistant: High

Value to Beneficial Insects

Special Value to Native Bees

This information was provided by the Pollinator Program at The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.

Find Seed or Plants

Find seed sources for this species at the Native Seed Network.

From the National Organizations Directory

According to the species list provided by Affiliate Organizations, this plant is on display at the following locations:

National Butterfly Center - Mission, TX
Native Seed Network - Corvallis, OR

Bibliography

Bibref 995 - Native Landscaping from El Paso to L.A. (2000) Wasowski, S. and A. Wasowski
Bibref 318 - Native Texas Plants: Landscaping Region by Region (2002) Wasowski, S. & A. Wasowski
Bibref 328 - Wildflowers of Texas (2003) Ajilvsgi, Geyata.

Search More Titles in Bibliography

From the Archive

Wildflower Newsletter 1995 VOL. 12, NO.3 - Explore the Big Bend With the Wildflower Center, Education Director\'s Report, T...

Recommended Species Lists

Find native plant species by state. Each list contains commercially available species suitable for gardens and planned landscapes. Once you have selected a collection, you can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search.

View Recommended Species page

Additional resources

USDA: Find Zinnia acerosa in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Zinnia acerosa in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Zinnia acerosa

Metadata

Record Modified: 2013-05-31
Research By: TWC Staff

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