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Native Plant Database

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Forestiera angustifolia (Narrow-leaf forestiera)
Redding, Wendy

Forestiera angustifolia

Forestiera angustifolia Torr.

Narrow-leaf forestiera, Tanglewood, Desert olive, Texas swamp-privet, Panalero

Oleaceae (Olive Family)

Synonym(s): Forestiera puberula, Forestiera texana

USDA Symbol: FOAN

USDA Native Status: L48 (N)

Rounded, evergreen shrub with smooth, gray branches coming off the main stem at 90 degree angles. Leaves simple, smooth, linear with entire margins. Flowers inconspicuous; greenish-yellow produced in clusters in the spring.

 

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Tree
Leaf Retention: Evergreen
Leaf Shape: Linear
Leaf Margin: Entire
Flower:
Fruit:
Size Class: 3-6 ft.

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Yellow , Green
Bloom Time: Mar , Apr

Distribution

USA: TX

Growing Conditions

Water Use: Low
Light Requirement: Sun
Soil Moisture: Dry
Soil pH: Alkaline (pH>7.2)
CaCO3 Tolerance: High
Drought Tolerance: High
Heat Tolerant: yes
Soil Description: Dry, alkaline, well-drained.

Benefit

Use Wildlife: Birds and small mammals browse twigs and fruit.
Interesting Foliage: yes
Attracts: Birds
Nectar Source: yes

From the National Organizations Directory

According to the species list provided by Affiliate Organizations, this plant is either on display or available from the following:

Texas Discovery Gardens - Dallas, TX
NPSOT - Austin Chapter - Austin, TX
National Butterfly Center - Mission, TX

Bibliography

Bibref 297 - Trees of Central Texas (1984) Vines, Robert A.

Search More Titles in Bibliography

Additional resources

USDA: Find Forestiera angustifolia in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Forestiera angustifolia in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Forestiera angustifolia

Metadata

Record Last Modified: 2014-03-04
Research By: TWC Staff

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